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The WHO patient safety curriculum guide for medical schools
  1. Merrilyn Walton1,
  2. Helen Woodward2,
  3. Samantha Van Staalduinen3,
  4. C Lemer4,
  5. F Greaves4,
  6. D Noble4,
  7. B Ellis4,
  8. L Donaldson5,
  9. B Barraclough6,
  10. for and on behalf of the Expert Group convened by the World Alliance of Patient Safety, as Expert Lead for the Sub-Programme
  1. 1Sydney School of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
  2. 2St Mary's Hospital, Imperial College, Healthcare NHS Trust, St Mary's Hospital, London, UK
  3. 3Office of Postgraduate Medical Education, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
  4. 4Patient Safety Programme, World Health Organization, Department of Health, London, UK
  5. 5World Alliance for Patient Safety, World Health Organization, Department of Health, London, UK
  6. 6International Society for Quality in Health Care, Wahroonga, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Professor Merrilyn Walton, Sydney School of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Sydney, Edward Ford Building (A27), Sydney 2006, Australia; merrilyn.walton{at}sydney.edu.au

Abstract

Background The urgent need for patient safety education for healthcare students has been recognised by many accreditation bodies, but to date there has been sporadic attention to undergraduate/graduate medical programmes. Medical students themselves have identified quality and safety of care as an important area of instruction; as future doctors and healthcare leaders, they must be prepared to practise safe healthcare. Medical education has yet to fully embrace patient safety concepts and principles into existing medical curricula. Universities are continuing to produce graduate doctors lacking in the patient safety knowledge, skills and behaviours thought necessary to deliver safe care. A significant challenge is that patient safety is still a relatively new concept and area of study; thus, many medical educators are unfamiliar with the literature and unsure how to integrate patient safety learning into existing curriculum.

Design To address this gap and provide a foothold for medical schools all around the world, the WHO's World Alliance for Patient Safety sponsored the development of a patient safety curriculum guide for medical students. The WHO Patient Safety Curriculum Guide for Medical Schools adopts a ‘one-stop-shop’ approach in that it includes a teacher's manual providing a step-by-step guide for teachers new to patient safety learning as well as a comprehensive curriculum on the main patient safety areas. This paper establishes the need for patient safety education of medical students, describes the development of the WHO Patient Safety Curriculum Guide for Medical Schools and outlines the content of the Guide.

  • Health professions education
  • medical education
  • patient safety

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Footnotes

  • The Expert Group convened by the World Alliance of Patient Safety comprises the following: B Flanagan, Monash University, Victoria, Australia; J Harrison, Monash University, Victoria, Australia; T Shaw, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; C Roberts, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; S Barnet, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; R De Alwis, International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; M Saad Al-Moamary, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; A Eid, International Federation of Medical Students' Associations (IFMSA); R Flin, University of Aberdeen, Old Aberdeen, UK; P Claver Kariyo, School of Medicine, Bujumbura; BL Lingard, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; J Martinez, Universidad Del Salvador, Buenos Aires, Argentina; C Soe, Ministry of Health, Myanmar; L Young-Mee, Korea University College of Medical Education, Seoul, Republic of Korea; M Zhang, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China; A Ziv, The Israel Centre for Medical Simulation, Sheba Medical Centre, Tel Hashomer, Israel.

  • Competing interests None.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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