rss
BMJ Qual Saf 22:242-250 doi:10.1136/bmjqs-2012-001045
  • Original research

The patient satisfaction chasm: the gap between hospital management and frontline clinicians

  1. David W Bates1
  1. 1Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  2. 2Centre of Emergency Medicine Research, Central Denmark Region, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark
  3. 3Wessex Deanery, NHS South of England, Hampshire, UK
  4. 4Assaf Harofeh Medical Center, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Zerifin, Israel
  1. Correspondence to Dr Ronen Rozenblum, Division of General Internal Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 1620 Tremont Street, BS-3, Boston, MA 02120, USA; rrozenblum{at}bics.bwh.harvard.edu
  • Received 2 April 2012
  • Revised 30 October 2012
  • Accepted 1 November 2012
  • Published Online First 23 November 2012

Abstract

Background Achieving high levels of patient satisfaction requires hospital management to be proactive in patient-centred care improvement initiatives and to engage frontline clinicians in this process.

Method We developed a survey to assess the attitudes of clinicians towards hospital management activities with respect to improving patient satisfaction and surveyed clinicians in four academic hospitals located in Denmark, Israel, the UK and the USA.

Results We collected 1004 questionnaires (79.9% response rate) from four hospitals in four countries on three continents. Overall, 90.4% of clinicians believed that improving patient satisfaction during hospitalisation was achievable, but only 9.2% of clinicians thought their department had a structured plan to do so, with significant differences between the countries (p<0.0001). Among responders, only 38% remembered targeted actions to improve patient satisfaction and just 34% stated having received feedback from hospital management regarding patient satisfaction status in their department during the past year. In multivariate analyses, clinicians who received feedback from hospital management and remembered targeted actions to improve patient satisfaction were more likely to state that their department had a structured plan to improve patient satisfaction.

Conclusions This portrait of clinicians’ attitudes highlights a chasm between hospital management and frontline clinicians with respect to improving patient satisfaction. It appears that while hospital management asserts that patient-centred care is important and invests in patient satisfaction and patient experience surveys, our findings suggest that the majority do not have a structured plan for promoting improvement of patient satisfaction and engaging clinicians in the process.

Free sample

This recent issue is free to all users to allow everyone the opportunity to see the full scope and typical content of BMJ Quality & Safety.
View free sample issue >>

Email alerts

Don't forget to sign up for content alerts so you keep up to date with all the articles as they are published.

 

Navigate This Article