Article Text

other Versions

PDF
Patients' perceptions of early supported discharge for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a qualitative study
  1. A Clarke1,
  2. R Sohanpal2,
  3. G Wilson3,
  4. S Taylor2
  1. 1Health Sciences Research Institute, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK
  2. 2Queen Mary University of London, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Centre for Health Science, Institute of Health Science Education, London, UK
  3. 3Hammersmith Hospitals NHS Trust, Charing Cross Hospital, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Aileen Clarke, Health Sciences Research Institute, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK; aileen.clarke{at}warwick.ac.uk

Abstract

Objective To explore patients' views of an early supported discharge service for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Intervention Early supported discharge service (EDS) with discharge at 3.5 days (average length of stay for COPD at the time was 9.5 days). After discharge, patients were visited at home daily for 3 days by a nurse from the early discharge service and then, as required, up to 2 weeks.

Participants Purposive, maximum variation sample of 23 mainly older, retired patients admitted to hospital with an acute exacerbation of COPD in 2005. 14 patients listed as receiving EDS, and 9 listed as refusing EDS.

Design Qualitative analysis of audiotaped, semistructured, face-to-face interviews.

Setting Economically deprived inner-city borough in England.

Results 1) Negotiation and consent. Patients had little recall of being approached to join the scheme. They often felt they had been discharged from hospital before they were ready. They were often unable or unwilling to negotiate timing of discharge with hospital staff. (2) Process of discharge from hospital. Patients experienced difficulties with transport home and supplies of medication. (3) Life at home after a hospital admission. Resuming life at home after an admission for an acute exacerbation for COPD was difficult. Not all patients found the home nursing component of the service helpful.

Conclusions Early supported discharge with domiciliary care is a model that ought to promote a more equal partnership between patient and healthcare, but this did not appear to be the case in practice.

  • Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive[MeSH]
  • patient discharge [MeSH]
  • hospital at home
  • patient-centred care [MeSH]
  • qualitative
  • length of stay [MeSH]

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Footnotes

  • Funding Funding was obtained in part from the DH NHS R&D NCCRCD Programme (SJCT) and in part from the local NHS through a direct grant from the Strategic Health Authority.

  • Competing interests GW was employed by the NHS in the area during the period of the study.

  • Ethics approval Ethical approval was obtained from the local research ethics committee.

  • Patient consent Obtained.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; not externally peer reviewed.

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.

Linked Articles

  • Quality lines
    David P Stevens