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This article has a correction

Please see: BMJ Qual Saf 2013;22:182

BMJ Qual Saf doi:10.1136/bmjqs.2011.051755
  • Original research

Visualising differences in professionals' perspectives on quality and safety

  1. Jeffrey Braithwaite1
  1. 1School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Australia
  2. 2Centre for Clinical Governance Research, Australian Institute of Health Innovation, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Australia
  3. 3Centre for Health Systems and Safety Research, Australian Institute of Health Innovation, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Dr Joanne Francis Travaglia, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Randwick 2052, Australia; j.travaglia{at}unsw.edu.au
  • Accepted 16 June 2011
  • Published Online First 31 July 2011

Abstract

Background The safety-and-quality movement is now two decades old. Errors persist despite best efforts, indicating that there are entrenched overt and perhaps less explicit barriers limiting the success of improvement efforts.

Objectives and hypotheses To examine the perspectives of five groups of healthcare workers (administrative staff, nurses, medical practitioners, allied health and managers) and to compare and contrast their descriptions of quality-and-safety activities within their organisation. Differences in perspectives can be an indicator of divergence in the conceptualisation of, and impetus for, quality-improvement strategies which are intended to engage healthcare professions and staff.

Design, setting and participants Study data were collected in a defined geographical healthcare jurisdiction in Australia, via individual and group interviews held across four service streams (aged care and rehabilitation; mental health; community health; and cancer services). Data were collected in 2008 and analysed, using data-mining software, in 2009.

Results Clear differences in the perspectives of professional groups were evident, suggesting variations in the perceptions of, and priorities for, quality and safety.

Conclusions The visual representation of quality and safety perspectives provides insights into the conceptual maps currently utilised by healthcare workers. Understanding the similarity and differences in these maps may enable more effective targeting of interprofessional improvement strategies.

Footnotes

  • Funding The research was supported under Australian Research Council's (ARC) Linkage Projects funding scheme (grant number LP0775514). We are also funded for research into patient safety via National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) programme grant 568612.

  • Competing interests None.

  • Ethics approval Ethics approval was provided by the University of New South Wales' Human Research Ethics Advisory Panel (HREA) (approval number 9_10_006) and ACT Health Ethics Committee (approval number ET.3/07.2740).

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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