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How do hospital boards govern for quality improvement? A mixed methods study of 15 organisations in England
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  • Published on:
    How do hospital boards use information for quality improvement?

    Thank you very much for your letter. We agree that the Schmidtke et al paper is highly relevant. In our discussion we note that 'recent research has emphasised the importance of meaningful representation and interpretation of data by boards', citing the accompanying editorial by Mountford and Wakefield which provides an overview both of the Schmidtke et al paper and another paper from the same issue by Anhøj et al on 'Red Amber Green' stoplight reports.

    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    How do Hospital boards use information for quality improvement

    Thanks to the authors for this insight. I wondered if they had seen this content http://qualitysafety.bmj.com/content/26/1/61 from Schmidtke et al. which deals with how boards are presented with data, including the consideration of chance (common cause variation). The material seems highly compatible.

    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.