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Identification of doctors at risk of recurrent complaints: a national study of healthcare complaints in Australia
  1. Marie M Bismark1,
  2. Matthew J Spittal1,
  3. Lyle C Gurrin1,
  4. Michael Ward2,
  5. David M Studdert1,3
  1. 1Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
  2. 2School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
  3. 3Melbourne Law School, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Dr David M Studdert, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, 207 Bouverie Street, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia, d.studdert{at}unimelb.edu.au

Abstract

Objectives (1) To determine the distribution of formal patient complaints across Australia's medical workforce and (2) to identify characteristics of doctors at high risk of incurring recurrent complaints.

Methods We assembled a national sample of all 18 907 formal patient complaints filed against doctors with health service ombudsmen (‘Commissions’) in Australia over an 11-year period. We analysed the distribution of complaints among practicing doctors. We then used recurrent-event survival analysis to identify characteristics of doctors at high risk of recurrent complaints, and to estimate each individual doctor's risk of incurring future complaints.

Results The distribution of complaints among doctors was highly skewed: 3% of Australia's medical workforce accounted for 49% of complaints and 1% accounted for a quarter of complaints. Short-term risks of recurrence varied significantly among doctors: there was a strong dose-response relationship with number of previous complaints and significant differences by doctor specialty and sex. At the practitioner level, risks varied widely, from doctors with <10% risk of further complaints within 2 years to doctors with >80% risk.

Conclusions A small group of doctors accounts for half of all patient complaints lodged with Australian Commissions. It is feasible to predict which doctors are at high risk of incurring more complaints in the near future. Widespread use of this approach to identify high-risk doctors and target quality improvement efforts coupled with effective interventions, could help reduce adverse events and patient dissatisfaction in health systems.

  • Health services research
  • Patient satisfaction
  • Quality improvement
  • Health policy

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