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Patient safety incident reporting: a qualitative study of thoughts and perceptions of experts 15 years after ‘To Err is Human
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  • Published on:
    Making sense of the story - the true value of incident reporting

    I was interested to read the thoughtful article by Imogen Mitchell and colleagues, echoing longstanding criticisms by Kaveh Shojania, Charles Vincent and others on the low value of high volume incident reporting. There is little learning from categorical data, repeated many times, around falls or minor medication errors. However, there was a time at the National Patient Safety Agency, where we experimented with a multi...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Incident Reporting - Let's Decentralise

    The Editor, BMJ Quality and Safety,

    Mitchell, Schuster, Smith et al (1) present the results of semi-structured interviews with 11 international patient safety experts, 15 years after publication of the US Institute of Medicine's landmark report 'To Err Is Human'.(2) One of the Institute's recommendations was the introduction of healthcare incident reporting.

    Qualitative analysis of the interviews by Mitchel...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.