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Factors associated with inappropriate use of emergency departments: findings from a cross-sectional national study in France
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  • Published on:
    The éléphant in the room

    We thank the French Society of Emergency Medicine for such a large study. However it is difficult to conclude regarding a number of limitations due to the observational cross-sectional study scheme.
    The main critics concern the 3 measurements tools allowing to decide appropriateness of ED visits or not. Appropriate Use Score Method: the authors decide a cut-off based on Italian litterature data which is not French sounded; Possible GP Use Method : it would be more accurate to have an external evaluation instead of a judge and part one ; Resource Utilisation Method : the elephant in the room is the result of consultation and the final diagnostic as well.
    I don’t discuss here the relevance of a number of items as distance between home and ED Departments, medical density and so far.
    Specifically I doubt it is possible to interpret socioeconomic and territorial factors results without diagnostics and diagnostic frequency on June, 11, 2013
    We are looking forward for more studies informing use of ED departments.

    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.