Table 2

Nursing satisfaction scores at baseline and 3 months after initial testing with low SpO2 alarm delay

Survey questionOctober 2015
n=38
February 2016
n=25
P value
Strongly agree or agreeStrongly disagree or disagreeStrongly agree or agreeStrongly disagree or disagree
The majority of the time SpO2 alarms are ‘nuisance alarms’ and do not require any action from the bedside nurse.35
(92%)
3
(8%)
11
(44%)
14
(56%)
<0.001
SpO2 alarms on the ACCU are adequate to alert bedside nursing staff to all clinically important oxygen saturation changes in the patient's condition.32
(84%)
6
(16%)
23
(92%)
2
(8%)
0.46
The current frequency of alarms is at such a level that the bedside nurse is able to receive and respond to every alarm appropriately and quickly.12
(32%)
26
(68%)
19
(76%)
6
(24%)
<0.001
Once per month or lessOnce per week or moreOnce per month or lessOnce per week or more
When you provide bedside care, at what rate do you estimate that clinical SpO2 alarms are missed and/or your response to a patient’s clinical oxygenation is delayed?16
(42%)
22
(58%)
18
(72%)
7
(28%)
0.02
  • Bold indicates statistical significance, p <0.05.